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Getty Villa- photography exhibit: In Search of Biblical Lands: From Jerusalem to Jordan

In Search of Biblical Lands: From Jerusalem to Jordan in Nineteenth-century Photography March 2–September 12, 2011 Getty Villa. 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades, CA. (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu/ Photo: 1870′s “Jews at the Wailing Wall,” Felix Bonfils

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Shakespeare Salon: April 14- Huntington

Shakespeare Salon: Scenes and Sonnets April 14 (Thursday) 7 p.m. The Independent Shakespeare Co. will present readings of some of the Bard’s sonnets and scenes, in the Huntington Art Gallery. Catherine Hess, curator of European art, will explore their connections to some of the masterpieces in the collection. Seating is limited. For information on ticket prices, please call: 626-405-2128. Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens 1151 Oxford Road. San Marino, CA  91108. http://www.huntington.org

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Tennessee William’s final play “A House Not Meant to Stand” -extends- till May 22nd

Tennessee Williams’ final play, never before seen on the West Coast: A HOUSE NOT MEANT TO STAND extends at the Fountain-  till May 22 The Fountain Theatre. 5060 Fountain Ave. LA CA 90029 (Fountain at Normandie) For information on show times and tickets (323) 663-1525 or www.FountainTheatre.com For a link to my review on this play, one of the best theatrical productions in LA this year, in my opinion, please see: Review: -Must See- Tennessee Williams puts the fun in dysfunctional at the Fountain Theater -Leticia Marie Sanchez

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Dudamel’s latest creation- congratulations!

The La Times reports the real reason why Gustavo Dudamel was unable to conduct last Tuesday’s concert with the Los Angeles Philharmonic: he and his wife Eloisa were having a baby boy. Many congratulations to the conductor on his newest creative endeavor! For more, please read: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2011/04/gustavo-dudamel-and-wife-welcome-baby-boy-martin-in-la.html

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In the news: Aphrodite Goes Home

Illegal Smuggling? Organized Crime? After much controversy, the Getty’s Villa’s Aphrodite goes home. Ciao bella! Buon Viaggio! For the full report, read: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/la-et-return-of-aphrodite-20110323,0,6998689.story

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In the News: the Curious Collection of the Barnes Foundation

Which American Museum has: 181 works by Renoir 69 Cezannes (more than in all the museums of Paris combined), 59 Matisses 46 Picassos and 7 Van Goghs The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia. This happens to be the spot that Matisse called, “the only sane place to see art in America.” Unfortunately, the collection will be at the Foundation for only two more months. The Independent covered the saga and court hearings behind the attempt to move the works of art out of the Foundation http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/rupert-cornwell/rupert-cornwell-is-this-the-biggest-art-heist-in-history-2246968.html as did the documentary Art of the Steal. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1326733/

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All the World’s a Stage: William Leavitt’s “Theater Objects” at MOCA

All the World’s A Stage: William Leavitt’s Theater Objects at MOCA By Leticia Marie Sanchez All photography© MOCA All the world’s a stage, all the men and women merely players. Nowhere does Shakespeare’s expression hold more true than at William Leavitt’s Theater Objects at MOCA. Walking into the exhibition one hears the constant chirping of birds and the flow of cool air. Are we in a jungle? A theme park? On the set of a play? Leavitt’s engaging exhibition interacts with its audience, causing the museumgoer to constantly question where he or she stands. Co-curated by MOCA Curator Bennett Simpson and Ann Goldstein, former MOCA senior curator and director of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, William Leavitt: Theater Objects represents the first solo museum exhibition and retrospective of the artist’s 40-year career. The exhibit showcases approximately 90 works from 1969

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Review: The Real Housewife of Düsseldorf County—Clara Schumann

The Real Housewife of Düsseldorf County—Clara Schumann Israela Margalit’s “Trio,” currently playing at the Lounge 2 Theater in Hollywood, offers a window into the artistic triangle between Robert Schumann, Clara Schumann, and Johannes Brahms. Maragalit, a concert pianist, tied the play together with her own recorded compositions of Schumann, Brahms, and Beethoven. Photo: From Left- Bjørn Johnson, Meghan Maureen Mc Donough. Jeremy Shranko Meghan Maureen Mc Donough played the grim, subdued Clara Schumann, a once famous concert pianist repressed as a housewife cooking beans. Mc Donough’s Clara was a woman drained by years of belittlement by an insecure husband who would toss cruel jabs at her, including, “Those who can’t compose, play.”Her father, dynamically portrayed by Peter Colburn, bemoaned the wasting of Clara’s life. Bjørn Johnson, captured Robert Schumann’s madness with pathos, particularly when he called out in the asylum for his beloved

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Mozart and the Barber Shop Chase

“Why Can’t you Sit Still? “Because I’m Mozart” In his delightful tome, The Book of Musical Anecdotes, Norman Lebrecht reveals that the perpetually inspired Mozart led his Barber on a hair-cutting chase: “Every moment an idea would occur to him…he would run to the clavier, the barber after him, hair-ribbon in hand.” Luckily for Mozart, the barber had a steady hand.

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Review: Young Director’s Night at LACMA

Review: Young Director’s Night at LACMA by Leticia Marie Sanchez On March 5, LACMA Muse presented its 10th Annual Young Director’s Night. Six talented young directors presented a wide range of creative films. Left. Sylvia Sether’s “Overdrawn.” Winner of the Art of Film Award Cat Youell’s “The Mischievous Case of Cordelia Botkin” brought to light a true story episode from 19th century San Francisco history (death by chocolate) with charm and humor.  Sylvia Sether’s “Overdrawn,” (and winner of the Fourth Art of Film Award) exhibited comedic chops and timing in its depiction of a single bank teller pushed to the edge. Jordan Bloch’s “Underdogs,” created unsettling tension as a bounty hunter wreaked havoc amongst diners in a roadside restaurant. Left. “House of Olive Trees” directed by Thouly Dosiois Thouly Dosiois’ beautifully shot “House of the Olive Trees,” set in Greece,

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