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Inspiration from Nature

All photography ©2017 Leticia Marie Sanchez

 Lake Tahoe, August 2017

 There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,

There is a rapture on the lonely shore,

There is society, where none intrudes,

By the deep Sea, and music in its roar:

I love not Man the less, but Nature more.

Lord Byron

 

Tahoe CCH 2Tahoe More CCH

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In the news: Classical Music to be played in north London to reduce crime

 

by

Leticia Marie Sanchez

In Broadwater Farm, an area of North London, Adam Weber, a 23 year old constable in charge of law and order, will be playing Beethoven and Mozart in an effort to reduce crime.

In the past the Broadwater Farm region was plagued by riots and violence, and Weber is hoping that classic music will have a similar effect to the use of music on the London Underground, where music was blared from speakers in 40 stations.

In the subway experiment, Weber revealed that incidents of verbal and physical aggression were reduced during the time period when the music was played.

As Bernard Berenson observed in 1952 at  Villa I Tatt in Florence, “Without art, visual, verbal and musical our world would have remained a jungle.”

For more details, please read:

http://www.classicfm.com/music-news/classical-music-broadwater-farm/

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Mozart and the Barber Shop Chase

“Why Can’t you Sit Still?

“Because I’m Mozart”

In his delightful tome, The Book of Musical Anecdotes, Norman Lebrecht reveals that the perpetually inspired Mozart led his Barber on a hair-cutting chase:

“Every moment an idea would occur to him…he would run to the clavier, the barber after him, hair-ribbon in hand.”

Luckily for Mozart, the barber had a steady hand.

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Wise Man of the Day: Plato

 Music Is a Moral Law. It gives soul to the Universe,

  Wings to the mind, flight to the imagination,

 Charm and gaiety to life and to everything.”

 


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Review: Ballet NOW- A Kaleidoscope of styles at the Music Center

Ballet Now

Review: Ballet NOW-

A Kaleidoscope of styles at the Music Center

By Leticia Marie Sanchez

With Ballet Now, the Los Angeles Music Center found itself as a global stage for the best that ballet has to offer. The performers included dancers from companies including: the New York City Ballet,  The Royal Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Dorrance Dance, Miami City Ballet, and the Paris Opera Ballet. The superlative choreography included the work of George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, Sir Kenneth MacMillan, Frederick Ashton, Ulysses Dove and Justin Peck. International dance sensation Tiler Peck curated the innovative kaleidoscope of pieces which kept both the dancers and the audience on their toes.

The ballet was a dynamic tapestry that skillfully juxtaposed contrasting shades of music, choreography, and talent. The program opened with the thought-provoking Increases, choreographed by Justin Peck and performed to Philip Glass’ Four Movements by Two Pianos. The palette of pale blue like a meditative Rothko, set the stage for a whimsical performance in which the dancers showcased their talent individually and collectively.  Immediately following the witty performance came the serious dreamy Pas de Deux from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet. In this piece the dancers movingly conveyed the sense of all-consuming love. In contrast to the introspective emotion evoked by Romeo and Juliet, Hershy Kay’s Stars and Stripes re-energized the audience with its exuberant, clipped beat and physical feats which roused the crowd to wild applause. Tiler Peck truly proved a standout with her flawless performance.

After the boisterous brass of Stars and Stripes, the Meditation from Thais by Jules Massenet was a welcome respite of introspection, a jewel of piece, choreographed by Frederick Ashton and danced by Lauren Cutbertson and Reece Clark. Next in the unique musical dialectic curated by Peck was Red Angels, choreographed by Ulysses Dove and performed to Maxwell’s Demon by Richard Einhorn. Red Angels was highlight of Ballet Now. Although first performed in 1994, it still felt innovative, pushing the boundaries of ballet into abstract expression. The effective lighting, and sparse, modernistic contrast between red and black, allowed the audience to focus their gaze on the dancers who alternated between harmony and discord, creating tension and anticipation through their movement.

The weakest link in the program was Fancy Free, which after the electrifying Red Angels, proved anti-climatic. The music of Leonard Bernstein was sensual and evocative and the cast of dancers charming, but unfortunately, Jerome Robbin’s choreography felt dated and at times veered into misogynistic territory. Sailors gaping at female pedestrians walking alone at night (and in one case, grabbing a lady’s purse) was intended to be light-hearted and humorous but made for uncomfortable viewing, as though one were gazing at Ruth Orkin’s iconic 1951 photo, “American Girl in Italy” in which a lone female walking alone hurries past a pack of leering men. However, the set design by Oliver Smith was stunning, a page of Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks” come to life.

During intermission, I overheard many audiences members commenting on what a treat it was to be able to enjoy shorter pieces, thereby enjoying a variety of composition, choreography, and dancers in one program. The superb lighting and striking set design complemented the varying shades of the artistic palette. Hopefully, these artistic kaleidoscopes will continue at the Music Center, keeping Los Angeles on the forefront of the international dance scene.

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In the news: Selfies and artistic collateral damage

Selfies: Artistic Collateral Damage?

by

 Leticia Marie Sanchez

selfie

One cannot deny the preponderance of selfies in today’s art world. One cannot enter a gallery, museum, or even concert venue without encountering a selfie taker, some more subtle and considerate than others.

Taking a selfie as a souvenir of an artistic experience is one thing. What is disconcerting is when I-phones become Weapons of Mass Destruction.

Unfortunately, the latest artistic destruction caused by a selfie apparently occurred this summer at the 14th Factory, a pop-up gallery in Los Angeles, where a clumsy student taking a selfie caused more than $200,000 worth of damage to a series of crowned pedestals by Hong Kong based multimedia artist Simon Birch.

Birch decided not to press charges against the individual because 1) she was a student and 2) it was an accident. In a statement released by Birch, the artist reveals:

“Each sculpture was painstakingly designed and built from all kinds of materials and involves 20-30 hours of man labor each. There are 64 unique ones, some made in the US, others in China. Four different creative collaborators and artists were involved in the process … It took years for the sculptures to be designed …”

An article in this week’s New York Times about the Birch incident reveals that this is only one of many episodes around the world of selfies causing artistic destruction.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/07/14/arts/design/oops-a-museum-selfie-gone-wrong-causes-200000-in-damage.html

Even the powerful, mythical Hercules has been crushed by a selfie; in 2015, a 300 hundred- year-old statue depicting the demigod was damaged by two eager selfie takers in Cremona, Italy.

A thoughtless selfie taker in Lisbon caused a statue of a 16th- century Portuguese king, Dom Sebastiao, to topple over and shatter.

Other news outlets report that the 19th Century Greek sculpture “Drunken Satyr” was damaged by a selfie taker in Milan who thought it was a good idea to jump into the statue’s lap. Unfortunately, the sculpture lost a leg.

Destruction by selfie is not limited to the artworks themselves; rather the collateral damage can extend to the entire artistic experience. Last year, I missed the overture to a lovely Mozart opera due to two selfie takers sitting in my row, snapping away and chatting loudly, long after the performance had begun. There is no reset button on a live performance. Once you miss the notes, they’re gone. On another occasion, my two-year old’s quiet discovery of the fountains at the Getty Center was brusquely interrupted an individual who barked, “Move out of the way of my selfie.”

At what point does an individual’s quest for a selfie take precedence over the artistic experience of those around them? There can be no doubt that we currently live in a solipsistic society. The most popular gadgets begin with the self-serving pronoun “I”: I-phone, I-pad, I-Tunes. Me. Me. Me.

Even if we were to ignore the damage to the artworks or the irritating distraction to those around them, how meaningful of an experience can an individual have with a work of art if his eyes and fingers are consumed by his I-phone?

The 19th century art critic John Ruskin once observed, “All that is good in art is the expression of one soul talking to another.”

And by soul, I don’t think that Ruskin meant Siri.
Photo: “Immortalization of Self” by Jana Cruder and Matthew La Penta photographed by Leticia Marie Sanchez at 2016 LA Art Show

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Top Summer Pick- BalletNOW at the Music Center: July 28-July 30

CCH- Top Pick—BalletNOW at the Music Center

This is a not-to-be-missed Cultural Cocktail of brilliant choreographers, stirring music, and world class dancers.

Each day has a different program, but musical highlights over the weekend include:

Dance Project PhotoPas de Deux from Romeo and Juliet by Sergei Prokofiev

Fancy Free by Leonard Bernstein

Thaïs by Jules Massenet

Four Movements for Two Pianos by Philip Glass

Choreography includes the work of George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, Sir Kenneth Mac Millan, and Christopher Wheeldon

The performers include dancers from companies including: the New York City Ballet, The Royal Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Dorrance Dance, Miami City Ballet and the Paris Opera Ballet 

BalletNOW 

The Music Center’s Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. 135 N. Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012

Friday, July 28 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 29 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, July 30 2:00 p.m.

For information on tickets and each day’s program please see: Musiccenter.org/balletnow

Photo Above: Tiler Peck, Photo courtesy of New York City Dance Project, Ken Browar and Deborah Ory

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Carriage Ride in Central Park..Mysterious Clouds Swirling Overhead…

Ezra Pound, Reflecting on New York:

“Here is our poetry, for we have pulled down the stars to our will.”

All photography ©2017 Leticia Marie Sanchez

Central Park Carriage Ride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C Park Ride Dakotas

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Cultural Cocktail Hour at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

“The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls”

Pablo Picasso

Cultural Cocktail Hour at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, July 2017

All photography ©2017 Leticia Marie Sanchez

Glorious Met 2Glorious Met 6Glorious Met 4

Glorious Met 1

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Cultural Cocktail Hour visit New York!

 

All photography ©2017 Leticia Marie Sanchez

“If London is a watercolor New York is an oil painting”- Peter Shaeffer

Central Park, New York,  July 2016

Manhattan 3Manhattan 4Manhattan 1

Manhattan 2

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