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Life of an artist…Philip Glass..

Philip Glass, the creative and celebrated modern composer, courageously blazed a trail despite all the absurdities facing artists.

According to Elizabeth Lundy, in Secret Lives of Great Composers, Mr. Glass took on sundry jobs to pay the bills during the 60′s and 70′s, even while his operas were being performed at the Met in Lincoln Center:

Shortly after the New York premiere of Einstein on the Beach, Glass was driving a taxi. A well-dressed woman got into the cab, looked at his name [tag], and said in surprise, ‘”Young man, do you realize you have the same name as a very famous composer?’”

[Secret Lives of Composers, 278]

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“Duchamp to Pop”- A Must-See Exhibit

  by

Leticia Marie Sanchez

Cultural Cocktail Hour® is a registered Trademark

This week’s Cultural Cocktail Hour involves a Pinch of Parody, a Dose of Double Entendre, and a Highball of Warhol- Bottom’s Up!

“Duchamp to Pop” is a must-see exhibit in Southern California due to the wit of Marcel Duchamp and his influence on the Pop Art Movement.

CCH loves any exhibit where you can unleash your inner art detective; “Duchamp to Pop” lends itself to peeling back layers of culture and indulging in wordplay and irony.

Cheeky puns are the name of the game. For instance, when one usually thinks of the Mona Lisa, one imagines crowds of tourists lining up to see a dignified work encased behind glass, vigilantly guarded by museum security.

Quite to the contrary, Marcel Duchamp’s mischievous Mona Lisa, La Joconde, bears an absurd mustache, and the letters L.H.O.O.Q. When read aloud, they form the French Phrase, “Elle a chaud au cul,” a risqué commentary on this fine lady’s posterior.

image

 

Don’t laugh at my mustache.

I dare you.

 A second word game in the exhibit involves Duchamp’s signature: Rrose Sélavy, a pun which evokes the French phrase: “Eros, c’est la vie,” or “Eros, that’s life.”

What does it mean when we gaze upon a mustachioed Mona Lisa? Simply, that we need not take Art, nor ourselves for that matter, so seriously. Art should not signify untouchable pieces on museum walls, but rather, the creativity that we can engender in our daily lives.

The humor and parody continue chronologically in the exhibit with Pop Artists like Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol. Andy Warhol’s Brillo Pads, and Pop Art in general, exposed the mass marketing that dominated the post-war era.

An Andy Warhol Soup Can sold originally sold for a measly $100.  Now these cans can be found in the purview of princes and oligarchs. (Warhol’s “Silver Car Crash” sold in 2013 for $105 million).

A bit ironic, that a movement that exposed American dependence on brands, had at its helm, an artist, Andy Warhol, who, himself became a brand. The reason that Warhol’s paintings can command stratospheric sums (and other artists cannot), is because of the name recognition. Like a Rolls Royce or a Patek Phillipe, a work by Warhol has clearly recognizable brand, and thereby, status significance.

The works of the Pop Artists embody parody and satire. Through this movement, we can chuckle at wordplay and irony. And Andy Warhol could laugh all the way to the bank.

d__images_P1969094L.H.O.O.Q. or La Joconde, 1964 (replica of 1919 original)

Colored reproduction, heightened with pencil and white gouache, Edition of 35, No. 6 (Arturo Schwartz edition)

comp: 10-1/4 x 7 in. (26.0 x 17.8 cm); sheet: 11-3/4 x 7-7/8 in. (29.8 x 20.0 cm)

Norton Simon Museum P.1969.094. Image Courtesy of Norton Simon.

 

d__images_P196906208Campbell’s Soup I: Black Bean

1928-1987 Silkscreen on paper 35-1/2 x 23-1/8 in. (90.2 x 58.7 cm)

Norton Simon Museum, Museum Purchase, 1969 P.1969.062.08. Image Courtesy of Norton Simon.

 

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Wise Man: Marcel Proust

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.

 

 Marcel Proust 

 

Marc Chagall


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Happy Birthday, leap year baby Gioachino Rossini


GiorcesRossini1Give me a laundry list

and I’ll set it to music”-

Gioachino Rossini

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Rossini’s Risky Business

“Please don’t throw me out the window!! I’m a MAESTRO!”

Does Procrastination lead to Defenestration?

Professor Robert Greenberg, in a wonderful lecture for the Teaching Company, read a letter in which opera composer Gioachino Rossini (nicknamed “The Italian Mozart”) confessed his last minute habits.

According to Rossini:

Wait until the evening before opening night- nothing primes inspiration more than necessity!

Whether it be the presence of a copyist waiting for your work or the prodding of an impresario tearing at his hair (In my time, all the impresarios of Italy were bald by 30).

I wrote the overture to La Gazza Ladra the day of its opening-

in the theater itself-

where I was imprisoned by the director

and under the direct surveillance of the stage hands who were instructed to throw my original text through the window, page by page, to the copyists waiting down below.

If I did not compose quickly enough-

the stage hands were instructed to throw ME out the window, instead.”

Lucklly, Rossini finished the overture to La Gazza Ladra in the nick of time.

Thus, avoiding the fate of the gentleman in pantaloons above.

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Picasso and Monets– burnt to a crisp?

 Picasso and Monets—Burnt To a Crisp?

by Leticia Marie Sanchez

Cultural Cocktail Hour® is a registered Trademark

Left:  Matisse, Reading Girl in White and Yellow(1919)

Will she ever see the light of day?

Carmelized Monet. No, this is not a trendy Crème Brule whipped up by a chef obsessed with molecular gastronomy, but quite possibly one of the most heinous art crimes covered by Cultural Cocktail Hour.

Olga Dogaru, mother of art thief Radu Dogaru, confessed to using her oven to set ablaze seven masterpieces valued at between 100 and 200 million Euros including works by Picasso, Matisse, Gaugin (and two by Monet) as if they were no more than slices of pizza.

Dogaru’s son Radu was the ringleader of a group of six Romanian art thieves who broke into Rotterdam’s Kunsthal museum last October with a set of pliers. After her son’s arrest, Mama Dogaru hid the pilfered artworks in a graveyard in the village of Caracliu (Talk about unresponsive audiences).Then, Ms. Dogaru essentially transformed this case from art kidnapping to outright art murder.

What museums desire most is to retrieve their works. Ergo, most art thieves with an IQ higher than a gnat realize that keeping the works intact can be a future bargaining chip in order to reduce their sentences.

In the dim attic of Ms. Dogaru’s mind, however, the light bulb went off a bit too late.

According to an interview with People magazine, Ms. Dogaru revealed her recent epiphany,

“I sense I made a big mistake.”

Alas, sense and sensibility does not seem to be her strong suit.  Moreover, with the classic Parenting 101 mistakes exhibited by Mrs. Dogaru (enabling, aiding, abetting, barbecuing Cubist works), it was inevitable that her mama’s boy would not wind up an Eagle Scout.

Of course, now the case has its inevitable twist.

According to Reuters, forensic experts linked Mama Dogaru’s humble oven to the traces of a specific Prussian Blue paint in addition to other materials corresponding with the missing paintings.

And yet, despite all evidence to the contrary, her son now claims that his mother’s initial confession was all a lie. That if he is somehow transported away from the blasted Bucharest courtroom and allowed to be tried in the Netherlands, he will reveal the paintings’ location.

Recently, however, the trial was delayed due to offending footwear.

The art thief’s defense attorney donned blue suede shoes, which sent the judge into a tizzy. The judge fined the attorney more than 1400 dollars for his bold fashion sense.

Unfortunately for Radu, having an attorney who dresses like Elvis is the least of his problems.


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Happy Cultural Valentine!

HAPPY’S VALENTINE’S DAY to my readers!

Wishing you a day filled with love, art, and music!

All Photography© 2016 Leticia Marie Sanchez

Cultural escapade at the Getty Center

Cultural Cocktail Hour® is a registered TrademarkV-day 4

V-DayV-Day 2

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Sculptures taking Selfies?

When even the sculptures take selfies, you know that we are in trouble!

What would Michelangelo say?

by Leticia Marie Sanchez

Kudos to these artists for providing a snapshot into today’s culture. Lines of tourists crowd Florence’s esteemed Uffizi Gallery, not necessarily to take the time to observe the art, but rather to take a quick selfie with Botticelli’s Birth of Venus before rushing onto the next Instagrammable moment. Today many individuals walk by masterpieces because they are too busy staring at their cellphones or getting ready for a closeup.

Based on Bertel Thorvaldsen’s “Eve Holding an Apple,” “The Immortalization of  Self” by Jana Cruder and Matthew La Penta captures today’s self-obsessed culture with cheeky precision.

CCH selects this work as the most timely at LA Art Show this week.

Narcissistic statue seen at LA Art Show 2016

selfie sculpture 1Selfie Sculpture 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Immortalization of Self” by Jana Cruder and Matthew La Penta, based on Bertal Thorvaldsen’s “Eve Holding an Apple”

Axiom Gallery

tumblr_m2gtnczn9G1rt1kt8o1_r1_400Bertel Thorvaldsen, Venus, 1813-16 (Copenhagen, Denmark, Thorvaldsens Museum)

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Pictures at an Exhibition- LA Art Show 2016

La Art Show7LorgnetteLa Art show 10La Art show 15La Art show 14LA Art show 11

by 

Leticia Marie Sanchez

Seeing Chagall’sMagic Flute was like running into an old friend.

Chagall and Klimt galore, plus a quite a few undiscovered surprises made LA Art Show a visual treat!

LA Art show 13LA Art show 1 LA Art show 5LA Art show 2La Art show 10

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CCH End-of-January Highlights

Cultural Cocktail Hour End-of-January Highlights

The end-of-January’s LA Cultural recipe includes: an Explosion of art, an Infusion of Impressionism, and a Shot of VerdiEnjoy!

Cultural Cocktail Hour® is a registered Trademark

LA CCHLA Art Show

January 27 – 31

http://www.laartshow.com

 

hale_crimson_600The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement

Jan 23 – May 09

Huntington Library. 1151 Oxford Road. San Marino, CA  91108. http://www.huntington.org

Philip Leslie Hale (1865-1931), The Crimson Rambler, ca. 1908, oil on canvas, 25 1/4 x 30 3/16 in. Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Joseph E. Temple Fund.

lamcchVerdi Requiem: Los Angeles Master Chorale

Sat. Jan. 30th, 2 pm; Sun. Jan. 31,  7 pm

Grant Gershon, conductor; Amber Wagner, soprano Michelle DeYoung, mezzo soprano;  Issachah Savage, tenor Morris Robinson, bass;   Walt Disney Concert Hall.. 111 S. Grand Avenue  LA, CA 90012. www.lamc.org

Photo credit: Jamie Pham

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