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Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Flasback to last summer- Color Factory in NYC’s Soho: “Kid-tested mother approved!”

  The Color Factory in NYC’s Soho- a treat for the senses! by Leticia Marie Sanchez Visting the Color Factory in NYC’s Soho was like stepping into the whimsical novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Even before entering the galleries we were greeted with savory Mochi and once inside treats galore: macaroons, vanilla blueberry gelato, and candies! Left: One of many sweet treats on our visit: Macaroons!     But the sweetest part of the day was the stimulating visual lesson on color!   At the entrance of the exhibit was 100 colors by Artist Emanuelle Moureax.         One of my son’s favorite rooms was “Balloon Wishes” with a welcoming placard, “When you wish upon a balloon/You find yourself in this Ombre Room.” Each balloon had a delightful wish bestowed by a student from 826 NYC.    

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Flashback to last summer- Painting à la Pollock, East Hampton, 2019

    Painting à la Pollock: Child’s Painting Class and Tour at Jackson Pollock’s Home,  East Hampton by Leticia Marie Sanchez Photography and text © 2019 Leticia Marie Sanchez Cultural Cocktail Hour® is a registered trademark Painting with my 4-year-old son underneath the sun dappled trees at Jackson Pollock’s home as we overlooked the abundant natural beauty of the Accabonac Creek proved one of the most treasured moments on my artistic foray to the Hamptons. My son and I participated in the wonderful Imagine That! Tour and art class led by engaging art educator Joyce Raimondo. The class commenced with a tour of Jackson Pollock’s studio, where the children searched for traces of the artist’s footprints in the vibrant floor covered by vestiges of his drip painting. The children then peered through a book showcasing Pollock masterpieces that currently hang at world

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Michelangelo’s Broken Nose

by Leticia Marie Sanchez  In light of the Getty Center‘s new exhibit, Michelangelo, Mind of the Master, an insight into the maestro that first appeared on Cultural Cocktail Hour a few years ago: As a teenager, Michelangelo Buonarroti suffered a blow at the hands of a green-eyed bully. Two different accounts of the story exist. In Vasari’s Lives of the Artists, Pietro Torrigiano, an artist studying with Michelangelo under the patronage of Lorenzo De ‘Medici, grew jealous of Michelangelo’s undeniable talent. Resentful of his former pal’s new status as teacher’s pet, Torrigiano delivered a blow that knocked the 15-year-old genius out cold. In the Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini, Torrigiano defended himself by saying that Michelangelo was teasing the other artists working in the Church of the Carmine. He admitted the viciousness of his attack: “I felt bone and cartilage go

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Michelangelo: Mind of the Master at the Getty Center – MUST SEE Exhibit

Review: Michelangelo: Mind of the Master-  Must SEE Exhibit February 25-June 7, 2020  Getty Center by Leticia Marie Sanchez What does it mean to be a genius? Artists throughout history have sought to mythologize their own personas, creating an aura of mystique around their identities as divinely inspired individuals. As part his self-created flamboyant persona, Salvador Dalí drove a cauliflower-stuffed Rolls Royce and showed up to a surrealistic exhibit dressed head-to-toe in scuba gear. In Michelangelo’s case, the Renaissance maestro tragically destroyed the majority of his 28,000 drawings so that the public would not realize that he had struggled for his art; Michelangelo preferred that people believed that his breathtaking masterpieces, like the frescoes on the Sistine Ceiling, were works that he created spontaneously. On several occasions, Michelangelo ordered his drawings to be burned. His biographer Giorgio Vasari noted that

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In the News: Missing Klimt painting discovered in the wall of Italian art gallery

In the News: Missing Klimt painting discovered in the wall of Italian art gallery by Leticia Marie Sanchez The long-lost “Portrait of a Lady” by Austrian artist Gustav Klimt was found hidden in a wall of the Ricci Oddi Modern Art Gallery in Piacenza. The gallery announced that experts deemed the painting to be an authentic work by Klimt. Unbelievably, while gardeners were cleaning ivy off a wall, they discovered the Art Nouveau painting concealed by a trash bag. How the painting ended up in the wall remains a mystery. Presumed to have been stolen, the painting disappeared from the gallery during a building renovation in 1997. Adding to the mystery, the painting’s frame was discovered near the gallery’s skylight after the work vanished, leading some to believe that art thieves could have entered and left through the skylight. The

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Review: “Egypt’s Lost Cities” at the Reagan Library- MUST-SEE exhibit

 Review: “Egypt’s Lost Cities” Uncovering an archaeological mystery at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library On View Until April 12, 2020  by Leticia Marie Sanchez The exhibit “Egypt’s Lost Cities” is intriguing for many reasons. Firstly, the exhibit takes the viewer on a journey to see the forgotten ancient cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus, which were discovered by mathematician-economist Franck Goddio and his team of underwater archaeologists. Secondly, the blockbuster exhibition at the Reagan Library contains an astonishing treasure trove of more than 200 artifacts, including gold coins, bronze vessels, jewelry, ceramics, statues of Cleopatra III, and Ptolemy XII as a Sphinx. The works are exceptionally intact, despite having been buried under the sea for more than two thousand years. Prior to the founding of Alexandria in 331 B.C. the harbor of Thonis-Heracleion controlled all the trade into Egypt and was

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The 120K Banana At Art Basel Miami

by Leticia Marie Sanchez Has the Contemporary Art world Gone bananas? At Art Basel Miami this week, a banana duct-taped to a wall sold for $120,000. Entitled “Comedian,” the piece was created by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan. Then, someone ate the banana. Artist David Datuna devoured the banana before being escorted away by security guards. However, according to Lucien Terras, the director of museum relations for Galerie Perrotin, which represented the work, Datuna’s action did not devalue the work. Teras stated. “He did not destroy the art work. The banana is the idea.”  You can buy a single banana for 20 cents.  You can buy Duct Tape for $4.99 But apparently, foolishness is priceless. Call me old fashioned, but I just don’t get the a-peel, pun intended! For the Full Story please read:  https://www.washingtonpost.com/arts-entertainment/2019/12/08/rogue-artist-ate-duct-taped-banana-art-basel-its-performance-he-said/#comments-wrapper  

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Review- Hope Springs Eternal: “Manet and Modern Beauty at the Getty Center”

Édouard Manet French, 1832 – 1883 Flowers in a Crystal Vase, about 1882 Oil on canvas Unframed: 32.7 × 24.5 cm (12 7/8 × 9 5/8 in.) National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection,1970.17.37 Image courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington EX.2019.3.100  Hope Springs Eternal:   Manet and Modern Beauty at the Getty Center  by    Leticia Marie Sanchez                                                                                                                           October 8, 2019 to January 12, 2020 Manet and Modern Beauty at the Getty Center is a MUST-SEE exhibit, not only due to the abundant works on view

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Review: By Day and by Night: Paris in the Belle Époque- A MUST SEE Exhibit at the Norton Simon

Review The darkness and light of LA Belle Époque at the Norton Simon Museum October 4, 2019-March 2, 2020 by Leticia Marie Sanchez La Belle Époque, which means the “beautiful age,” evokes thoughts of frothy, light-hearted spectacle: can can dancers, entertainment posters, cabarets, bistros, and electrifying nights at the theater during France’s Gilded Age. However, the Norton Simon Museum’s exhibit By Day & by Night: Paris in the Belle Époque reveals the deeper psychological dimensions beneath the glittering surface: the dichotomy between dynamic crowds and a sense of isolation, between affluent patrons and an often despairing working class, and between a frenzied pace and moments of pause. This vast exhibit includes works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Édouard Vuillard, Pierre Bonnard, Edgar Degas, and Pablo Picasso. The exhibit was expertly curated by Norton Simon Acting Chief Curator Emily Talbot whose curation revealed

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The Sherry-Netherland: A welcome dose of Beauty and Civility

 Review: The Sherry-Netherland A welcome dose of Beauty and Civility in Manhattan by  Leticia Marie Sanchez Amidst the hustle and bustle of New York City is a place that embodies civility at its finest: The Sherry-Netherland. If you find yourself lost, a sidewalk clock on Fifth Avenue bearing the hotel’s name lets you that you have arrived. The resplendent lobby ceiling harkens back to the Vatican. In fact, the artist who created the ceiling, Joseph Aruta found inspiration for his glorious mural in Raphael’s frescoes in the Vatican Palace.   Many of the details of this gilded building, including the walls, mosaic floors, and panels inside the elevator were originally part of the Vanderbilt mansion. White-gloved attendants lead you to the elevator, squiring you to your room where fresh flowers await. The joyful white flowers are accompanied by handwritten welcome

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