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Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

Classical Music for healing

Hopeful music during these dark days of violence and tragedy. Thank you to Brian Lauritzen – KUSC for sharing this inspiring piece of music on his program. The St. Olaf Choir, Anton Armstrong, Conductor, performs “Even When He Is Silent” by Kim André Arnesen.

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Cultural Cocktail Hour Contest- Win 2 tickets to season opening of Pittance Chamber Music

Southern California Residents, please email culturalcocktail@gmail.com a message about you think is missing in the LA Arts and culture scene. What do you think would MOST improve the performing arts in LA? SUBJECT LINE: CCH Contest The winning entry will receive a pair of tickets to the season opening performance of the Pittance Chamber Music! Deadline for sending your contest entry is Thursday September 7th. The concert is Saturday, September 16, 2017 at 3:00 p.m. at ​Eva and Marc Stern Grand Hall. The Music Center’s Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. 135 North Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012 The season opening program program of Mozart, Berg, Brahms and Bernstein, featuring Principal players from the LA Opera Orchestra, along with Domingo Colburn Stein Young Artist, soprano Elizabeth Zharoff.  The full program is listed below: Soprano:        Elizabeth Zharoff  Horn:              Steven Becknell 

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Mozart and the Barber Shop Chase

“Why Can’t you Sit Still? “Because I’m Mozart” In his delightful tome, The Book of Musical Anecdotes, Norman Lebrecht reveals that the perpetually inspired Mozart led his Barber on a hair-cutting chase: “Every moment an idea would occur to him…he would run to the clavier, the barber after him, hair-ribbon in hand.” Luckily for Mozart, the barber had a steady hand.

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Impressionistic Summer’s Eve…

  All photography ©2017 Leticia Marie Sanchez Impressionistic summer clouds perfectly blending perfectly with the music of Ravel & Debussy at a concert performed by the incredibly talented Salastina Music Society      

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Review: The Colburn Orchestra at Walt Disney Concert Hall

Dancing and playing into our hearts The Colburn Orchestra and Dance Academy at Walt Disney Concert Hall By Leticia Marie Sanchez On Friday evening, the Colburn Orchestra had the audience at the Walt Disney Concert Hall on the edge of their seats. It was a night celebrating the trajectory of of love, from the sweet lightness of the music of Irving Berlin to the dissonant passionate struggle in Sergei Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet. Leonard Bernstein’s “Overture to Candide” opened the program with enthusiasm and proved a fitting bookend to the intensity of Prokofiev.From the music of Bernstein, the music flowed smoothly to the music of Irving Berlin arranged by Scott Ninmer. The transportive choreography by L.A Dance Project Founder Benjamin Millepied added to the uplifting nature of the evening. Dancers from Colburn Dance Academy conveyed a soaring spirit of optimism, their

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Behind the Scenes with Vittorio Grigòlo: Master Class with the superstar Tenor

Behind the Scenes with Vittorio Grigòlo:  Master Class with the superstar Tenor By  Leticia Marie Sanchez All photography ©2017 Leticia Marie Sanchez A master class with Vittorio Grigòlo offered an unexpected lesson in chemistry, conducting, and electricity. The charismatic opera star has been in Los Angeles where he stars as E.T.A Hoffman in LA Opera’s Tales of Hoffman. While in Southern California, Grigòlo led master classes with Angels Vocal Art, an organization that fosters emerging vocal talent. Singers auditioned for the chance to perform for the world class tenor. At the master class, Grigòlo told the students that opera singers are also conductors.“A conductor is not somebody who has a baton in his hand..It’s a tube that can bring energy from the stage, passing through the people in the orchestra seats and sending it through the theatre. Conductors and Semi-Conductors. Electricity. We bring

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Wagner, Robber,and the Flying Dutchman

                                                        Wagner, Robber, and the Flying Dutchman By Leticia Marie Sanchez Cultural Cocktail Hour® is a registered Trademark He not have been an actual thief, but Richard Wagner’s Newfoundland dog Robber successfully stole the composer’s heart. In Wagner Without Fear, author William Berger regales us with colorful tales from Wagner’s life, including his tumultuous journey from Riga to Paris. When the debt-ridden Wagner and his wife Minna decided to escape from present-day Latvia, the composer insisted that Robber join them, despite the great risk. Cossack patrols guarded the Prussian border, with orders to shoot and kill the unlucky fugitives who caught their attention. Miraculously, the pooch did not make a peep as they dashed

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Review: Pittance Chamber Music

Pittance Chamber Music and the Chambers of the Heart By Leticia Marie Sanchez All photography ©2017 Leticia Marie Sanchez Chamber Music comprises music that can be played in a large room or chamber, or as denoted by the French “chambre.” This week’s concert by Pittance Chamber Music suggests a second meaning: music that penetrates the chamber of the heart. The ensemble evoked a raw immediacy and poignancy through their talented performance and moving repertoire. Particularly moving were the pieces set to verse. Ralph Vaughan William’s “On Wenlock Edge” was set to “A Shropshire Lad” by A.E. Housman while Benjamin Britten’s “Folk Songs,” included the verses of 18th century Irish Poet Thomas Moore. Tenor Arnold Livingtson Geis sublimely captured the nuanced shades of love, death, loss, and humor in the verses which were simultaneously rooted in nature and soaring in spirit.

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Beethoven: In a Stew Over Beef?

by Leticia Marie Sanchez According to Norman Lebrecht, author of “The Book of Musical Anectodes” (Simon & Schuster, 1985), Beethoven flew off the handle when a waiter at the Viennese restaurant “The Swan,” brought him the wrong meat dish. Some artists are particular about their piano benches (Gould) while others are particular about their beef.  An outraged Beethoven hurled the dish, gravy and all, over the waiter’s head. Just as the wrong meat could turn him into a raging bull, the right one could turn him into a loving lamb.  When his friend Ferdinand Ries sent him a particular type of roast veal, Beethoven kissed and embraced him, telling him “never had anything given him such pleasure as the roast veal, coming at the very moment when he so greatly longed for it.” (Lebrehct, 81) Beethoven also adored bread soup,

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Sibelius and the Cigar Royalty

According to Katerine Bakeless, in her book “Story Lives of Great Composers,” Jean Sibelius received minor ducats for one of his most famous compositions, Valse Triste. The payment for his work? A small sum and a box of cigars. Meanwhile, Valse Triste went on to be performed internationally, over and over. Yet, Sibelius did not receive one dime of royalties on the work he had composed. Bakeless revealed, “Years afterward, when Sibelius visited America, he remarked to his hostess, with tears in his eyes, that he could have used that money when his family of daughters began to grow up. “(39) The payment of a box of cigars for the beautiful, dream-like waltz, is, in fact, tres triste.

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